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Computer Skills? Your Resume Needs More Than Microsoft Office

Today’s job market looks far different than it used to, and as a result, job seekers must be prepared to adjust their skillset and job search tactics in order to remain competitive. This is especially true of computer skills in today’s tech-driven market. “It used to be that unless you were a software engineer, some kind of designer, or in telecommunications, computer literacy meant you were familiar with the basic parts of Microsoft Office: Word, Excel, Powerpoint,” writes Job Search Expert Jacob Share in a recent article. “All that’s changed.”

Nearly every profession today relies on technological tools or software that have immensely improved the function of certain roles. Additionally, the majority of employers now simply expect candidates to be equipped with basic Word or Excel skills. As a result, emphasizing your abilities beyond the minimum qualifications can give your resume and edge on the competition.

Read Also: 5 Creative Ways To Refresh Your Resume Design—Without Overdoing It

While acquiring new tech skills depends heavily on your industry and particular job function, here are a few of the top computer skills you should look to add to your resume:

Quickbooks

Regardless of your profession, learning how to keep the books will always be a valuable skill—it’s not just for accountants anymore. This is particularly true if you are responsible for a budget, or plan to be responsible for a budget in the future.  As a result, understanding this software is a universal computer skill that can only add value to your resume.

Free Quickbooks tutorials

Coding Languages

With so much of our lives happening online, it’s no secret that understanding coding is a more valuable skill than ever before. While many professionals may feel that they don’t need to learn coding for their particular role, it should be understood that even those who work in adjacent roles around technology may come into contact with code from time to time. Even though you may not be expected to build a web page any time soon, it would certainly help if you had an understanding of what you were looking at.

Learn free with Codecademy

Graphic Design

Similar to coding, images and graphics are more present in our world than ever before. With social media, advertising, and email, businesses need to be able to produce quality images—and they often don’t have a skilled graphic designer to do it. As a result, those who understand how to navigate user-friendly tools to create quick graphics can be an asset to an organization.

Create simple graphics free with Canva

Advanced Excel Functions

While basic Microsoft Office skills are expected, Excel in particular has a lot of advanced functions that many job seekers don’t actually have a grasp on. This includes functions like pivot tables, V-lookups, formulas, and macros. For those who can demonstrate that they understand how to analyze, manipulate, and present data in Excel, they’ll be in a great position amongst their competition.

Excel help center

Other specialty programs

In certain industries, software is relied upon heavily, and most employers will require experience with those tools, or similar platforms. For example, healthcare professionals are typically required to have experience with Electronic Medical Records (EMR) systems like EPIC. Additionally, human resources professionals are often expected to possess working knowledge of HRIS systems like Oracle or Workday. Plus, in digital or creative roles, you may be expected to understand platforms like Google Analytics or Customer Relationship Management (CRM) tools like Hubspot.