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5 Job Search Mistakes That Can Cost You The Job

Embarking on a job search is a job in and of itself, and with so many opportunities out there, it can be hard to decide how best to spend your time.  In order to find success at the end of the process, it’s important to be aware of trivial mistakes that could stand in the way of a potential job offer.  To get you started, here are five mistakes you’ll want to avoid at all costs:

Not following instructions

If you rush to submit an application or prepare for an interview, you could miss key instructions that can raise some red flags about your eligibility for the role.  To be sure you don’t make a foolish error, read everything, from the job description to interview instructions, carefully.  Sending your resume in the wrong format or going to the wrong floor for your interview is sometimes all it takes to eliminate you from the running.

Not reading the job description

While two different job postings may have the same job title, the responsibilities are not going to be identical.  As an applicant, reading the description thoroughly will help you determine your interest level in the positon and evaluate how best to highlight your experience.  Not only will this help you tailor your resume to the role, but you’ll also be able to answer questions more thoroughly in the interview process.

Not researching the company

Once you start the interview process, it will be painfully obvious to the hiring manager if you haven’t done your research on the company.  However, it’s also important to do this before writing and submitting an application.  Although your cover letter should be describing your qualifications and accomplishments, it should also be written for the specific role and how your skills can have a positive impact on the company.  The more research you do, the more it will show in these critical stages of the hiring process.

Applying for everything

While a job search can be time-consuming, applying for every job that is mildly related to your skill set is typically not the answer.  Rather than casting a wide net, focus on the quality of the opportunities.  In the end, spending more time on one job that you’re really excited about is more likely to pay off.

Not sending a thank you note

Getting to the end of an interview in one piece is an accomplishment on its own, but the work is not done yet.  Before you leave the room, collect the interviewer’s contact information, and send a timely thank you note (within 24-48 hours).  In the note, be sure to thank them for their time, and include an anecdote about your earlier conversation.  This reinforces your interest in the position, and it will keep you fresh in the mind of the decision maker.

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